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Posts made in April, 2013

Have Your Gift and Eat it Too

By on Apr 17, 2013 in Specialty and Unique Gifts

Looking to get creative with gifts? Edible Arrangements is the perfect combination for a delicious and creative gift to make that special persons day. What exactly are these Edible Arrangements that everyone can’t stop talking about? Edible Arrangements offer an array of fresh products including fruit arrangements, which vary in different shapes and sizes, and gourmet chocolate dipped fruit. The ordering process is super quick and easy; you can call in an order to one of their 1000 stores, pick it up, have it delivered, or order a basket online. Edible Arrangements is open and ready to go 7 days a week, so you can always rely on them for last minute gifts.  Edible Arrangements is also fantastic because they have a grab and go concept in their stores with fruit smoothies, juices, and salads, and to add to that, they also have a line created just for kids! This line dedicated just for kids features popular characters and themes like Scooby Doo, Spiderman, Hello Kitty, and Mickey Mouse. Some fun history about Edible Arrangements: The first Edible Arrangements franchise was opened up in Waltham, Massachusetts in 2001, and two years later, opened in East Toronto, Canada. Is anyone in the mood for some Edible Arrangements, Eh? In 2005, Edible Arrangements showed their sweet support for Breast Cancer by introducing their Breast Cancer collection, featuring pink chocolate. Ten percent of their sales in this collection went to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, and in 2006, they also partnered with the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Edible Arrangements has an astonishing 1000 (and counting) stores in 15 countries around the world. Mother’s Day is just around the corner, and now that you know anything and everything possible about Edible Arrangements, give them a call, head on over to one of their stores, and surprise Mom with the most creative and delicious Mother’s Day gift yet! Source: Edible...

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The Car of the Future

By on Apr 17, 2013 in Electronics

Just a few years ago, self-driving cars sounded like something straight out of a sci-fi movie. Today, they’re a reality. Driverless cars are approved for testing in three states: Nevada, Florida, and California—home of Google, the brainchild behind the project. Lead by Google engineer Sebastian Thrun, an early prototype for the driverless car, dubbed Stanley, received $2 million in funding from the US Department of Defense in 2005. Since then, more than 15 engineers are devoted to the project, hoping to make self-driving cars safer, and eventually available to the masses. As of March 2013, Google’s cars have driven over half a million miles with no accidents. One of the major advantages of self-driving classes is that they can be safer than regular vehicles. Outfitted with over $150,000 worth of equipment, including a $70,000 laser system, Google’s cars have the ability to take thousands of snapshots, and detect and respond to outside situations with much greater precision than humans. Google claims that driverless car technology can reduce traffic accidents, wasted commute time, and the number of cars on the road by 90 percent in the long run. The spillover effects span across a variety of sectors and include reduced travel delays, increased productivity, and decreased medical costs. Despite the excitement surrounding self-driving cars, the vehicles have met their fair share of challenges. Google’s cars are currently unable to drive in the snow, as poor driving conditions reduce visibility and prohibit the car from properly “seeing” lanes. Engineers have yet to determine how these cars will respond to random human situations like a spare tire in the middle of the street, or a traffic cop physically directing traffic. In cities where Google cars are being tested, such as Mountain View, residents have launched complaints about the risks associated with gawking pedestrians and curious onlookers who are eager to catch a glimpse of the novel car. Perhaps, as the novelty wears off, both users and non-users will begin to become more comfortable with driverless cars. Sources: Businessweek, Business...

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Facebook Takeover: Part 2

By on Apr 17, 2013 in Electronics

Worth a brand value of $13.1 billion dollars, $3.1 billion in sales and used globally in over 200 countries around the world, Facebook has dominated the social media market since its launch in 2004. So what is Mark Zuckerberg’s next big move going to be with the billion dollar brand? Since being an app on a phone wasn’t satisfying enough for Zuckerberg, he decided to take the next step, and move Facebook directly into the cell phone business. Facebook is releasing software that puts newsfeeds from the social network onto the home screens of Android phones. So of instead of going through an app to get to Facebook, Facebook Home provides you with instant access to your photos, comments, chats, and more. Facebook Home offers a rich and exciting experience for Facebook fanatics, and could also potentially help keep Facebook on top, as its competitors like Snapchat and Instagram continue to gain popularity on mobile devices. Tech pros like Steve Shultz, chief operator of Pageonce, and Andrew Eye, CEO and Co-founder of Taskbox highly praised the new Facebook Home. Shultz commented on the innovation as “a clever way to bring social content to the forefront of your phone” and exclaimed that Facebook Home will be the start of a new trend, as other enthusiasts, like sports enthusiasts, might acquire something similar to Facebook Home, but for sports. Eye also commented “Facebook is competing for attention and time spent and with the launch of “Home” they may have just gained an incredible advantage.” Although Facebook Home has its perks, there could potentially be a downfall to this new software. As if infinite access to email and text messaging, Facebook, and Twitter wasn’t enough, the release of “Home” could be just another distraction from interacting with people and being present. This might just be one more incentive for people to pay less attention to the people around them, and stay glued to their cell phones.  Only time will tell to see if Facebook Home is a complete hit or miss. Source:...

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A Great Read for Women

By on Apr 17, 2013 in Books and Magazines

To an aspiring businesswoman, Sheryl Sandberg seems to have it all—a superior education, supportive family, and a stellar career. Her debut novel “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead” has sparked global attention regarding the lack of advancement opportunities for women in the workplace, and what women should do to reach their potential. The book has amassed somewhat of a cult following, and has received praise by notable book reviewers and celebrities including Oprah Winfrey and Chelsea Clinton. Though women have made significant strides in terms of advancement in the workplace, there is still much room for improvement. Only 14 percent of Fortune 500 executive positions and 17 percent of board seats are held by women—a meek figure, especially considering more women than men are graduating from college throughout the nation. In an excerpt with Time magazine, Sandberg proposes some mindsets that women should strive to embody to help boost their careers. To start, Sandberg notes women must stop underestimating themselves, or holding back. Often times, women who are planning to have children or families in the future will scale back on promotions or advancement opportunities years before they temporarily leave the workforce to have a child. In scaling back, women place themselves at a significant disadvantage over men, whose career trajectories advance exponentially. When they are ready to return to the workforce, women may feel underutilized or underappreciated because their current position no longer matches their abilities. Here, Sandberg proposes “leaning-in,” and engaging in challenging projects up until the time a child arrives. Sandberg also describes an interesting experiment that highlights how likability and success are positively correlated for men, and negatively correlated for women. Two groups of students read the exact same case study about a successful, outgoing entrepreneur—half were told the entrepreneur’s name was Howard, and the other half were told Heidi. Though both groups of students found that the entrepreneur in the case study was competent and able, Heidi’s group labeled her less appealing, and pushier. Again, Sandberg notes it’s important to be cognizant of these judgments, and strive to alter perceptions so men and women are held to the same standard. While Sandberg has her fair share of critics who argue that...

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